Games for Reinforcing Melodic Notation

by Abby @ Quaver on June 17, 2013

in In the Quaver Classroom!

Quaver Teacher Amanda Gonzales of Rincon, Georgia is back with more game ideas for reinforcing musical concepts!

Don’t miss her Rhythm Review post from last week, and check out these ideas for teaching Melodic Notation:

Today, we’ll focus on Games for reviewing the Lines and Spaces of the Musical Staff! I hope you are getting some great ideas to spark some inspiration while you enjoy a relaxing summer vacation. We will all return to school again in the fall just brimming with new ideas and ways to re-energize your old tried and true lessons!

My favorite Quaver Notation Games:

The following games are IWB activities located in the Lines & Spaces Classroom at QuaverMusic.com:

  • Remembering Lines & Spaces – Give students the chance to come up with their own mnemonic devices – quirky sentences to help them remember EGBDF and FACE.  It is also fun to allow them to draw a picture depicting their sentence! This will help them remember their sentence better and is sure to get lots of giggles in your classroom. One of my students came up with this sentence last year: “Every Georgia Bulldog Defeats Florida” which was a bit hit in our classroom!
    • Other suggestions from the Quaver Facebook Page:
      • Every Good Burger Deserves Fries – Jim Meske: Westdale, IL
      • Even George Bush Drives Ford – Catie Dwinal: Laconia, NH
      • Elmo Goes Belly Dancing Fridays – Darlene Hartley: Ocala, FL

Remembering

  • Lines & Spaces Staff Champion – My students absolutely love all the Staff Champion games – electronic flashcard competitions.  They LOVE to play in game mode and try to beat their score each time. You can play with the Bass Clef and Grand Staff as well.

Staff Champion

Other favorite activities:

  • Bottle Cap Staff – Our school earns free supplies for the music classroom through the Coca-Cola School Rewards program, so after we log in hundreds of codes to their site – I end up with lots of bottle caps left over.  This activity is a great way to use up those extra caps, and reinforce our notation lesson, too.
    1. I hand draw a large staff (with 5 lines) on a single sheet of paper – making sure the spaces are large enough for the caps.
    2. The caps become the note heads. They won’t have stems, but for our purposes of line/space note name identification it works and keeps things simple!
    3. There are many ways to play, but my students’ favorite is in groups of 2.  One person takes bottle caps and spells out a word using the note names each cap represents.  The other person must figure out what word has been spelled.  They then switch jobs.
    4. To aid my students I will often make a word bank on the board (words that can be spelled using letters in the musical alphabet).  Very often the students will come up with some new words and we add it to the bank as well!

     

  • ABC Lineup – This game again uses those handy bottle caps.  Can you tell I have a ton laying around?
    1. I write on the bottle cap one letter from the music alphabet and put them all together in a large bag.
    2. First child selects a cap, and then the next child selects a cap.  The 2nd cap is then placed either before or after the first cap on the board, depending on the order of the music alphabet.  The goal is to get the caps in the correct ABCDEFG music alphabet order.
    3. This simple game drives home the basics of the musical alphabet – including that tricky repeating G – and can be made more advanced with the addition of a staff.
    4. You can play this game as a whole class, in teams or small groups.

     

  • Music Staff Bean Bag Toss – This is an all-time favorite in my classroom! I created a very large Treble Clef Staff for our classroom, and I split the class in two teams.
    1. One student from each team comes up to the staff.
    2. Student A tosses a bean bag onto the staff (important rule here, they must land on the staff or the other team automatically gets a point), and the first person to identify the note name (based on where their bean bag lands) gets a point.
    3. It’s a game of memory and speed.  Typically I will give the kids about 10 seconds to think then I will say ready set go, and the first child who answers me correctly get the point.

     

  • Melodic Notation Dice Game – We enjoy playing with dice in my classroom, and we play this game in groups of two!
    1. Each group is given 1 die, a copy of the directions, and a music staff dry erase board/marker (You can easily make some by laminating a staff you make or by sliding them into sheet protectors)
    2. Points are given as students complete the task, based on the number they roll.  The higher the number, the harder the task.
      • Roll 1: Draw a treble clef sign.
      • Roll 2: Draw a treble clef sign and # the lines of the music staff.
      • Roll 3: Draw a treble clef sign and # the spaces.
      • Roll 4: Draw treble clef sign, draw notes on all the spaces and label them with their letter names.
      • Roll 5: Draw treble clef sign, draw notes on all the lines, label the notes with their letter names.
      • Roll 6:  Draw treble clef sign, write notes of the music alphabet in order on the music staff

Do you have any favorite games you play to review the note names and music alphabet? 

What are you favorite IWB’s for Episode 9 and how do you use them?

 

{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

1 Josh February 4, 2017 at 1:02 pm

I love it!!!

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